Benefits of Water Exercise

Lower Blood Pressure

Just getting into the pool lowers blood pressure for most people, and this effect lingers for a period even after you get out of the pool.

Exercise Comfort

Pool temperatures are typically between 80 and 86 °F. Water conducts heat away from the body and keeps exercisers cool and comfortable during exertion.

Stronger Lungs

The hydrostatic pressure against the chest increases the work of breathing, which strengthens the muscles of respiration.

Stronger Heart

Hydrostatic pressure pushes blood out to the extremities, increasing stroke volume and cardiac output, while at the same time lowering the heart rate.

Oxygenation

Blood flow to the muscles increases an amazing 250%.  The extra blood flow not only delivers oxygen to working muscles, but also helps heal damaged tissue.

Healthier Kidneys

Increased cardiac output means greater blood volume is pushed through the kidneys, increasing urine output to help patients with moderate kidney disease.

Reduced Impact

Buoyancy lifts the body upward, reducing impact shock to protect and assist joints and muscles while challenging balance.

Joint Aid

Offloading the joints eases movement for people with MS, arthritis, fibromyalgia, spine pain, neuropathy, post polio syndrome, and other conditions.

Resistance Training

Water offers 12 times the resistance of air, requiring an exerciser has to apply more force to move in the water than similar actions require on land.

Variable Intensity

Water is a dynamic resistant force, meaning the more force applied to the water, the more resistance the water offers in return.

Lower Risk

Because of water resistance, exercise movements tend to be slower and more controlled, which lessons the risk of injury.

Balanced Strength

Resistance is constant on all sides in the water, which helps promote muscular balance.

Stress Reductions

Being in water reduces the stress response and creates a feeling of relaxation.

Exercise Fun

Weightlessness is perceived as fun by most exercisers.

© 2015 Christine Alexander